• Northeast Kollel

Parshas Vayikra: Live Inspired!

Updated: Mar 14, 2019

by HaRav Yonah Burr Shlita


פרשת ויקרא / זכור



At the end of Parshas Beshalach, the Torah recounts the story of Amelek’s attack on the Jewish People. The world had just witnessed the most miraculous events in history- the ten plagues, the splitting of the sea, the exodus of an entire nation from the Egyptian world power. The Nations of the world were left awestruck, terrified to stand in the way of the newly born Jewish People. Nevertheless, Amelek attempted the impossible, to attack them even at the height of their success.


The very next Parsha in the Torah is Parshas Yisro, which describes how Yisro, Moshe’s father in law, gave up his comfortable position in the land of Midian, to join the Jewish people in the desert. The Talmud cites an opinion that Yisro didn’t actually join the Jewish People until much later on when Moshe brought down the second set of Luchos, a few months later. Why then does the Torah place the story of Yisro right after the story of Amelek?


We all go through life and have moments of inspiration. The choice is ours whether we internalize the lesson and act upon it, or let it fade and go unused.

Perhaps the answer is to show us the contrast. Both Yisro and Amelek witnessed the same miraculous occurrences--the ten plagues, the splitting of the sea--the difference was what they did what that knowledge. Amelek, refusing to acknowledge the truth, tried to wipe out the inspiration and to fight against it. Even if they couldn’t succeed in battle, perhaps they could at least detract from the aura of the people and minimize the effect of the miracles. Yisro, on the other hand, took the lessons of the miracles and internalized them. He was prepared to change, and leave his comfort zone in order to grow and improve. They both saw the same thing. The difference is what they did with it.


We all go through life and have moments of inspiration. Whether it is something we’ve seen, something we’ve heard, or something we’ve learned. The choice is ours whether we internalize the lesson and act upon it, or let it fade and go unused.


May we all merit to be inspired and live inspired!


Have a wonderful Shabbos!